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Species Deilephila elpenor - Elephant Hawk Moth - Hodges#7894.1

Look who's at my doorstep :) - Deilephila elpenor unknown bug - Deilephila elpenor unknown bug - Deilephila elpenor Light trap set up - Deilephila elpenor Light trap set up - Deilephila elpenor Caterpillar - Deilephila elpenor
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Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Bombycoidea (Silkworm, Sphinx, and Royal Moths)
Family Sphingidae (Sphinx Moths)
Subfamily Macroglossinae
Tribe Macroglossini
Genus Deilephila
Species elpenor (Elephant Hawk Moth - Hodges#7894.1)
Hodges Number
7894.1
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Deilephila elpenor (Linnaeus)
Orig. Comb: Sphinx elpenor Linnaeus, 1758
Syn: Choerocampa elpenor (Linnaeus)
* phylogenetic sequence #229475
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet elpenor is from Elpenor of Greek mythology, who was changed by Circe into a hog. The caterpillar, with its neck extended, is said to resemble a hog's snout. (1), (2)
Common name Elephant Hawk Moth is also a reference to the caterpillar, in this case resembling an elephant's trunk.
Numbers
Sole member of this genus in North America.
Size
Wingspan 7 cm.
Range
so. British Columbia, Canada - Map / Eurasia, North Africa, Japan.
Season
June-Aug (MPG, BG data)
Food
Larvae on Chamaenerion, Clarkia, Galium, Calla, Impatiens.
Life Cycle
Species accounts by Powell and Opler (2009) (3) and Tuttle (2007) (4)
Remarks
Reportedly introduced to British Columbia ca. 1995.
Internet References
Works Cited
1.An accentuated list of the British Lepidoptera, with hints on the derivation of the names.
Anonymous. 1858. The Entomological Societies of Oxford and Cambridge.
2.Dictionary of natural history terms with their derivations, including the various orders, genera, and species.
David H. McNicoll. 1863. Lovell Reeve & Company.
3.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.
4.The Hawk Moths of North America, A Natural History Study of the Sphingidae of the United States and Canada.
James P Tuttle. 2007. The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation Inc.