Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#67680
Kiowa Dancer - Argia immunda

Kiowa Dancer - Argia immunda
Leakey, Real County, Texas, USA
July 30, 2006
Anyone?

Violet
What about Violet Dancer? Thats what it looks like to me.

 
Violet/Variable Dancer
Violet Dancer (new name Variable Dancer) has only segments 9 and 10 blue, but the one in this photo has 8, 9, and 10 blue.

Not Powdered
Not Powdered Dancer; Powdered Dancers don't have a blue tip to the abdomen. In that species, in mature males, the abdominal tip is whitish. I don't believe Powdered is ever purple on the front, either, though there is a blue form female Powdered Dancer.

I can't come up with a good ID for this off the top of my head. Either this species doesn't live in West Virginia and I've never seen it, or else a species that is usually blue on the front is purple in this instance.

 
How about?
After some searching of some of my previous photos (and others), I think it might be a Kiowa Dancer. It apparently has the turq. tipped tail. Edited the orig.
Jason

 
I'm not so sure
The pattern on the body of the Kiowa dancer, termed "distinctive" in the Info section of Bug Guide, looks to me more like diamonds or triangles than stripes. (I didn't see anything about the tail tip there.) Also, they look to me to be less blue, more towards grey. But I'm no expert, and I'm struggling with ID on several damsels myself.

 
Take a look..
Take a look at this link. These sure do look similar to my layman's eye. http://www.greglasley.net/kiowadan.html
What do you think?
Jason

 
I see and agree
Thanks for the link. Glad you got your ID and I learned something new. (Now, I'm sure one of mine is a Kiowa Dancer.)

 
Looks okay for Kiowa
Looking at Westfall & May's 650 page book on NA damselflies, I think this image is consistent with Kiowa. They mention the forked black stripe on the side of the thorax, which is thinner in the upper part of the fork than the lower. They mention femora's & tibiae's bi-colored pattern. They describe the abdominal markings segment by segement, so for example segments 4-6 are light-dark-light-dark.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.