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Photo#70710
Milkweed Tussock Moth Pupa - Euchaetes egle

Milkweed Tussock Moth Pupa - Euchaetes egle
Anderson Point Park, Wake County, North Carolina, USA
August 14, 2006
Size: 14 mm
Pupa of the caterpillar captured and fed Common Milkweed leaves. It pupated on or about July 31, 2006. I gave it shredded paper under which to crawl and pupate. Length of pupa was measured at 14 mm.

Hmm. It looks like some of the (stinging?) hairs from the caterpillar are incorporated into the pupal case.

Images of this individual: tag all
Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar - Euchaetes egle Milkweed Tussock Moth Pupa - Euchaetes egle Milkweed Tussock Moth Imago - Euchaetes egle Milkweed Tussock Moth Imago - Euchaetes egle

Yes, I've seen that before with hairy caterpillars
I think Eric left a comment somewhere to the effect that they might still have stinging properties for protection - I'm not sure how that would work.

 
Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars
My son brought home about 25 of these from Scouts the other night. Most of them are in the last instar and are happily feeding. I have only seen one photo of the cocoon, and that was on this site. Can anyone give me some more information about what to look for before they cocoon and how to care for the cocoons? Thanks!

 
You'll need to keep them about three weeks
after they pupate, if they behave like this one. Sheltered and in similar conditions to outdoors would be best - a screened-in porch for instance. They'll make their cocoons when they're ready - just keep feeding the caterpillars till then. I expect they'll start wandering, looking for a good place to pupate - providing shredded paper to shelter in might work for you, too. Make sure you check on the cocoons often when they get near to the time they should emerge, so you can free the adults.

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