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TaxonomyBrowse
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Genus Strumigenys - Miniature Trap-jaw Ants

Formicid - Strumigenys membranifera Formicid - Strumigenys pergandei Mini Trap Jaw Ant with Springtail Prey - Strumigenys Mini Trap Jaw Ant with Springtail Prey - Strumigenys Ant - Strumigenys Formicidae 5 - Strumigenys Missouri Strumigenys - Strumigenys - male Unknown Ant - Strumigenys eggersi
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon (Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps)
Superfamily Formicoidea (Ants)
Family Formicidae (Ants)
Subfamily Myrmicinae
Tribe Attini ("Higher" myrmicines - no group name)
Genus Strumigenys (Miniature Trap-jaw Ants)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Pyramica
A note from Dr. J.C. Trager (3/16/2010): "This is a bone of contention among myrmecologists at the moment. Strumigenys is a large and somewhat unwieldy genus, but there is growing evidence it is in fact monophyletic, while the subdivisions Strumigenys (s.str.) and Pyramica are paraphyletic. [Hymenoptera Name Server] is technically correct, since it follows what the latest reviser says, that they are synonymous. At the Global Ants Project - EOL "summit" at the Field Museum this November, we rather grudgingly came to the conclusion that we must follow this, even if Bolton's splitting seems somehow more comfortable. So basically, yes, we should lump them all into Strumigenys. An interesting thread on the matter from my favorite blog."
formerly placed in Dacetini
Explanation of Names
Strumigenys Smith 1860
Numbers
close to 1000 spp. worldwide