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Photo#800440
Unknown centipede - Sigmoria ainsliei

Unknown centipede - Sigmoria ainsliei
Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee, USA
July 8, 2013
Size: Over an inch long.
At Ijams Nature Center in South Knoxville. Seen on a sidewalk between the parking lot and a woodland. Early morning.

Moved
Moved from Millipedes.

I've actually collected at th
I've actually collected at this very sight. If memory serves it is Sigmoria (Falloria) ainsliei (Chamberlin) (polydesmida: Xystodesmidae). Nice blue transverse bands.

 
For the ID I...
thank you! It was a very beautiful millipede, one I'd never seen before. Quite a nice surprise on my morning walk.

Cropped and moved for expert attention.
Moved from ID Request.

Our millipede experts will be more likely to see this here.

Welcome to BugGuide!

Looks like a millipede
...as opposed to a centipede. One way to tell them apart is that millipedes have the "shell-like" arch-shaped plates on the top of each segment (whereas no centipede, to my knowledge to my knowledge has that feature). More importantly, though, you can see two pairs of legs on each segment in this picture; that only is a dead-giveaway that it is a millipede, as centipedes only have one pair per segment. Can't help you on genus or species yet, though; sorry!

 
Thank you...
Well, at least that's a "millistep" in the right direction!

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