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Photo#84736
Bright Cuckoo Leafcutter - Coelioxys slossoni - female

Bright Cuckoo Leafcutter - Coelioxys slossoni - Female
Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park, Hidalgo County, Texas, USA
October 18, 2006
Size: 11 mm
Size estimated. A strikingly-marked species which resembles such photos as this one by Tony DiTerlizzi from Florida:

Abdominal structure indicates a female, I believe.
As Tony has mentioned, there is a key to Florida Coelioxys , but it does not look possible to follow it based on photographs.

Images of this individual: tag all
Bright Cuckoo Leafcutter - Coelioxys slossoni - female Bright Cuckoo Leafcutter - Coelioxys slossoni - female

Moved
Moved from Subgenus Neocoelioxys to C. s. arenicola based on comments by Josh Rose--see below.

Moved
Moved from Coelioxys.

Coelioxys (Neocoelioxys)
very likely C. slossoni arenicola but I haven't completely ruled out menthae yet and need to recheck specimens.

Note the swollen subocellar area, red T1, distinctive yellow hair patches, shape of abdominal apex, etc.

 
specimen confirmation (sorta)
I was just going through some old e-mails and came across one by Texas bee guru Jack Neff, which included a list of species he had collected in the park (35 species) and the county (94). Sure enough, the only species of this genus he had caught in the park was C. s. arenicola. He had C. texana for the county but not the park.

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