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Subclass Acari - Mites and Ticks

Nymph Mite under bark Anystis sp. - Anystis Dirt mite - Euzetes Left spiracular plate (ventral view) - Dermacentor variabilis - male Long-legged Velvet Mite Hymenoptera from Boxelder with possible beetle Dermacentor - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Chelicerata (Chelicerates)
Class Arachnida (Arachnids)
Subclass Acari (Mites and Ticks)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Taxonomy follows(1)
Numbers
ca. 50,000 described spp. worldwide (many times as many undescribed)
Remarks
Six-legged condition: Acarine larvae normally have 6 legs rather than 8, unless that feature has been lost secondarily. Some mites may have no legs at all at some life stages. This condition doesn't follow a particular taxonomic pattern, but is based more on species or life-stage ecology. Parasitic or phoretic mites, in particular, may lack some or even all legs. Some adult mites have 6 legs (one pair lost secondarily), e.g., in Metacheyletia spp. the hind legs are reduced or absent. (Jon Oliver's comments)
Internet References
MiteSite. USDA, last update 2010
Bee Mites. University of Michigan