Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington


Robberfly species? - Promachus vertebratus
Robberfly species? - Promachus vertebratus
West Chicago Prairie, Cook County, Illinois, USA
August 31, 2004
Not sure what species...anyone have an idea?

tiny brown beetle - Atomaria
tiny brown beetle - Atomaria
Ailsa Craig, Ontario, Canada
April 17, 2004
Very tiny (2 mm); found in forest leaf litter near a lingering patch of snow. I considered posting under Chrysomelidae but I'm not sure they're that.

creepy insect - Leptopterna dolabrata
creepy insect - Leptopterna dolabrata
near Ailsa Craig, Ontario, Canada
June 4, 2004
2 of 2 images of this specimen.
This scary-looking thing was found clinging to the underside of a cinquefoil leaf beside a country road. Body length about 8 mm. Whatever it is, I wouldn't want to find it on my pillow one morning!

orange-tipped flower fly - Blera analis - male
orange-tipped flower fly - Blera analis - Male
Thedford Conservation Area, Ontario, Canada
June 11, 2004
Blera analis, IDed by Dr. Jeff Skevington. Another photo is at Cedar Creek under the former name, Cynorhina analis.

orange-shinned flower fly - Eristalis flavipes - female
orange-shinned flower fly - Eristalis flavipes - Female
near Ailsa Craig, Ontario, Canada
July 22, 2004
Eristalis flavipes, IDed by Dr. Jeff Skevington. The orange hind tarsi and other characters shown here distinguish this one from another common hairy species, E. anthophorina.

Fire-Colored Beetle - Neopyrochroa femoralis - male
Fire-Colored Beetle - Neopyrochroa femoralis - Male
Albemarle County, Virginia, USA
April 22, 1985
2 of 2 images of this specimen.
Robin's nice photo of a female of this Family led me to dig out this old photograph from Virginia, depicting a male. The beetle was attracted to lights on April 23.

I believe this might be genus Dendroides; I would value others’ comments.

Want to see what a real artist can do with a Pyrochroidae?

white-banded flower fly - Eristalis dimidiata - male
white-banded flower fly - Eristalis dimidiata - Male
near Ailsa Craig, Ontario, Canada
April 13, 2004
On Coltsfoot. A smaller version of this photo appears here under Eristalis dimidiata. IDed by Dr. Jeff Skevington. Some of the images in the Guide may be this species too, as others have suggested.

hourglass flower fly - Eristalis arbustorum - male
hourglass flower fly - Eristalis arbustorum - Male
Ailsa Craig, Ontario, Canada
May 4, 2004
IDed as Eristalis arbustorum by Dr. Jeff Skevington, I think this is the same species as this image in the Guide, as others have suggested. The link to E. arbustorum on this page points to a plate that says the color pattern of the midleg is a good way to distinguish this species from the similar E. brousii.

Harvester Ants - Pogonomyrmex badius - female
Harvester Ants - Pogonomyrmex badius - Female
Stuart, Florida, USA
November 25, 2004
Shot of the nest entrance showing the smaller-headed workers. This is the same nest that this major worker was taken from:

This photo was taken at the Seabranch Preserve State Park.

Harvester Ant - Pogonomyrmex badius - female
Harvester Ant - Pogonomyrmex badius - Female
Stuart, Florida, USA
November 25, 2004
Commonly called "Bull Ants", this is one of the large-headed workers. If I am right here, this could be the Florida Harvester Ant, Pogonomyrmex badius. This article by the University of Florida greatly coincides with these large ant nests that I frequently witnessed down in S. Florida.

This photo was taken at the Seabranch Preserve State Park.