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Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

Wisconsin Oecanthinancy, Contributing Editor
Full name:
Wisconsin Oecanthinancy
City, state, country:
Southeastern Wisconsin
Biography:

Totally obsessed with Tree Crickets :D


An accidentally grown sunflower on my small 3d story patio was the chosen singing spot for a male Neoxabea bipunctata in the fall of 2006. I was smitten with not only his singing; but also the fact that he had made 5 separate holes of the same size, shape and location on each of 5 leaves...which he used as a baffle to amplify the sound of his song by putting his opened wings over the hole. Amazing.

In the summer of 2008, I raised approximately 50 tree crickets in 'Oecanthinariums' in order to gain some expertise in identification of species as well as to document their behaviors. Wisconsin is apparently a great state for Oecanthinae...as I have found Black-horned, Snowy, Two-spotted, Four-spotted, Narrow-winged, Pine, and Davis' --- all within a one-block area from my front door.

I only study Oecanthinae...and will begin adding information to the guide pages for all species. My mission is to bring Tree Crickets to the forefront of the insect world -- since the sounds of late summer/early autumn would not be the same without them!

(I'm still searching for Prairie, Broad-winged and Tamarack Tree Crickets) in Wisconsin.

I'm still working on my website: http://www.oecanthinae.com/

My mission is to increase awareness of, and thus popularity of, tree crickets. I have written a children's book entitled

Trixie the Tree Cricket

-- it can be purchased or downloaded at
http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/trixie-the-tree-cricket/5272897


I have also written All About Tree Crickets -- it can be purchased at https://www.amazon.com/about-Tree-Crickets-Nancy-Collins/dp/147870134X

Nancy Collins


Walker T.J. and Collins N.J. 2010. New world thermometer crickets: the Oecanthus rileyi species group and a new species from North America. Orthoptera Journal of Research. 19: 371-376. http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/walker/buzz/s576lwc10.pdf


Collins N. and Symes L. 2012. Oecanthus walkeri: a new species of tree cricket from Texas. Orthoptera Journal of Research. 21(1): 51-56. http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/walker/buzz/574lcs12.pdf


Symes L. and Collins N. 2013. Oecanthus Texensis: A New Species of Tree Cricket from the Western United States. Journal of Orthoptera Research, 22(2):87-91 http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/walker/buzz/s576lsc13.pdf


Collins N., Vandenberghe, E. and Carson, L. 2014. Two New Species of Neoxabea, Three New Species of Oecanthus, and Documentation of Two Other Species in Nicaragua (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Oecanthinae) Transactions of the Entomological Society, 140(1):163-184.http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.3157/061.140.0111?journalCode=taes