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Photo#1012207
Bromeloecia seltzeri - NEW GENUS - Bromeloecia - male

Bromeloecia seltzeri - NEW GENUS - Bromeloecia - Male
Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, USA
September 1, 2014
Size: ~1mm
The male metatarsus has a few enlarged hairs coming off the dorsum of tarsomere 4. The shape of this separates the three Neartic species. In B. winnemana there is a long process terminating in two long hairs. In B. tarsiglossa the long process ends in a setulose lobe. In seltzeri the process is very short and inconspicuous and ends in long hairs.

As best I can tell this is B seltzeri. There is a very short process and two long hairs. The process seems too short to be B. winnemana.

Images of this individual: tag all
Bromeloecia seltzeri  - NEW GENUS - Bromeloecia - male Bromeloecia seltzeri - NEW GENUS - Bromeloecia - male Bromeloecia seltzeri - NEW GENUS - Bromeloecia - male

Moved
Moved from Limosininae.

None of the above?
This does not look identical to any of the illustrations in Marshall (1983).

 
seltzeri
I took another look at this specimen and it appears that there is a very short process and two long hairs, which would make this B. seltzeri. Unfortunately, this tiny fly is pushing the limits of what my iPhone and Leica can photograph. Eventually I'll get some higher res stacked photos of that tarsus...

 
Look at the whole tarsus
Compare the proportions of all five segments of the tarsi. If I use the width of the first tarsomere as an arbitrary measurement unit, the tarsi of seltzeri are approximately

1.0x1.0, 1.1x0.8, 0.6x0.8, 0.4x0.8, 1.0x0.5

I get different values for your fly depending on which photo I use, so there's some confusion due to angle.

Also compare the shape of tarsomere 5. The reason I'm hesitant is, Marshall's revision was limited by the amount of material he had available. Mostly it came from one collector.

Moved
Moved from Limosininae.

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