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TaxonomyBrowse
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Genus Admontia

Tachinid Fly  - Admontia - female Fly - Admontia degeerioides - female Fly - Admontia degeerioides - female Fly - Admontia nasoni - female Fly - Admontia degeerioides - female Fly - Admontia Tachinidae, lateral - Admontia nasoni Tachinide - Admontia degeerioides
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon (Calyptratae)
Superfamily Oestroidea
Family Tachinidae (Parasitic Flies)
Subfamily Exoristinae
Tribe Blondeliini
Genus Admontia
Explanation of Names
Admontia Brauer & Bergenstamm 1889
Identification
Females of most species have broad fore tarsi. This is not the normal condition in Tachinidae, but is also found in several unrelated genera.
"Species of Admontia may be relatively easily recognized by the simultaneous presence of bristles on the facial ridge, short, appressed setae on the parafacial, and bare eyes." (Wood, 1985)
Range
Most of Northern Hemisphere and temperate South America
Food
Larvae are parasitoids of Tipulidae and possibly Lepidoptera.
Remarks
Larvae seek out hosts in hidden places, e.g. under soil or in stems. Eggs are deposited where hosts are likely to be found. (Wood & Cave 2006)
Print References
Wood, D. M. 1985 A taxonomic conspectus of the Blondeliini of North and Central America and the West Indies (Diptera: Tachinidae). Memoirs of the Entomological Society of Canada 132: 1–130.
Wood, D. M. and R. D. Cave. 2006. Description of a new genus and species of weevil parasitoid from Honduras (Diptera: Tachinidae). Florida Entomol. 89: 239-244 (PDF)
Internet References