Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1015205
possible Aphoebantus out of range - blue bee fly - Ocyptamus

possible Aphoebantus out of range - blue bee fly - Ocyptamus
McAllen, Hidalgo County, Texas, USA
October 27, 2014
Size: 1/2 - 3/4 inch
On a Turks Cap leaf - in the shade. When viewed from directly above the wings are straight across (180°).

Images of this individual: tag all
possible Aphoebantus out of range - blue bee fly - Ocyptamus possible Aphoebantus out of range - blue bee fly - Ocyptamus

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Why not a Syrphid fly?
Why not a Syrphid fly?

 
Agree with Syrphid
Maybe something like this?


 
A novice's questions
Thank you Mr Dankowicz, Mr. Wolgemuth. Pardon my indiscretion in asking in asking if the thickness of the body is important in identification. Also does the color band width and edge mater?
Mr. Wolgemuth's photo shows a thin body with complete bands of color as opposed to "my" fuller body (compared to the thorax) and partial (upper half only) color band with an "L" of color.

 
All of those characteristics could be important.
I chose the image just to demonstrate that there are similar flies in Syrphidae. Yours could very well be a completely different species (or genus). I'm confident that it's a syrphid, though.

 
Thank you Sir!
Thank you Mr. Wolgemuth.

 
For what it's worth, I'm pret
For what it's worth, I'm pretty confident it's in the Ocyptamus cylindricus species group. Moving it there, since we have few images in that group and more records are probably helpful. (species group as there's some work remaining to be done to reclassify those guys)

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.