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TaxonomyBrowse
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Species Trimerina madizans

Fly - Trimerina madizans Fly - Trimerina madizans Small Fly - Trimerina madizans Small Fly - Trimerina madizans Small Fly - Trimerina madizans Fly - Trimerina madizans Fly - Trimerina madizans Fly - Trimerina madizans
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon ("Acalyptratae")
Superfamily Ephydroidea
Family Ephydridae (Shore Flies)
Subfamily Discomyzinae
Genus Trimerina
Species madizans (Trimerina madizans)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Trimerina madizans (Fallen, 1813)
Numbers
The only species of the genus in North America.
Identification
Sharply margined abdomen, no prescutellar arcostichal setae, lateral vertical setae absent.

Similar to some other related Ephydridae (such as Leptopsilopa) but the above characters combined with the foreleg coloration (tibia and tarsi black, femur and coxae yellow) distinguish this species. Note though that this leg pattern is also present in some Leptopsilopa.
Range
Northern transcontinental in North America. Holarctic, so also in Europe.

Ontario to Saskatchewan & Montana, south to New York, Colorado, & California.
Habitat
Moist meadows and open wetlands. Dense growth of herbaceous vegetation seems to be preferred. (1)
Food
Larvae feed on eggs of spiders belonging to Micryphantidae. Hypselistes florens (Cambridge) was found as the only host during a study in Ohio. (1)
Works Cited
1.Biology of Trimerina madizans, a predator of spider eggs (Diptera: Ephydridae)
Foote, B.A. 1984. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, 86: 486-492.