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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#1016991
Helicobia - NEW GENUS - Helicobia rapax - male

Helicobia - NEW GENUS - Helicobia rapax - Male
Hanover, Jo Daviess County, Illinois, USA
August 2, 2014
This is a lateral shot of a male's terminalia.

Images of this individual: tag all
Helicobia - NEW GENUS - Helicobia rapax - female Helicobia - NEW GENUS - Helicobia rapax - female Helicobia - NEW GENUS - Helicobia rapax - female Helicobia - NEW GENUS - Helicobia rapax - male Helicobia - NEW GENUS - Helicobia rapax - male Helicobia - NEW GENUS - Helicobia rapax - male

Moved
Moved from Helicobia.

Moved
Moved from Sarcophaginae.

Compare...
See if it looks like this when extracted:
http://sarcophagidae.myspecies.info/taxonomy/term/1439/media

 
H. stellata?
I've added a better photo of the genitalia. It seems closer to H. stellata.

 
Reference
Illustrations are in

Roback, S. S. 1954. The evolution and taxonomy of the Sarcophaginae (Diptera, Sarcophagidae). Illinois biol. Monogr. 23 (3-4): 1-181.

(Reference not seen.)

 
Updated photos

 
Helicobia rapax
Greg Dahlem, the American expert on Sarcophagidae, thinks this is probably H. rapax. That is the species you would expect based on the genus ID: rapax is very common, and it is the only species known from Illinois.

 
Error in the database
Thomas Pape informs me the photo of male terminalia on the rapax page is not of H. rapax, but the SEM images are. He also says the cerci are similar in the two species and they are separated by the shape of the distiphallus.

 
Odd
I agree it looks closer to H. stellata, which is not supposed to occur so far north.

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