Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Upcoming Events

Discussion of 2018 gathering

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington


Family Eupelmidae

wasp - Eupelmus vesicularis - female chalcid wasp Wingless Wasp? - Eupelmus vesicularis Parasitic wasp - female Wasp - Eupelmus epicaste Parasitic Wasp - Anastatus Beautiful Wasp - Eusandalum - female Is this a Chalcidoidea of some kind? - Metapelma spectabile
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon ("Parasitica" (parasitic Apocrita))
Superfamily Chalcidoidea (Chalcid Wasps)
Family Eupelmidae
3 subfamilies, with >120 spp. in 17 genera in our area and >900 spp. in 45 genera worldwide(1)
Elongated metallic-colored body with a flat mesonotum, wings with a long marginal vein, some blotched. A long and stout mid-tibial spur, and the fore and hind-coxae widely separated.
Some are wingless or have very short wings.
Parasites on a wide range of species of different orders (Lepidoptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Neuroptera, Orthoptera); some are secondary parasites(1)(2)
Life Cycle
Parasites of a wide range of hosts; some species parasitize hosts of several different orders. A few are parasites of spiders.
Some are good jumpers; this ability is made possible by their capacity to bend the head and abdomen over the thorax, somewhat as click beetles. When they die they usually bend the head and abdomen over the thorax.(2)
Internet References