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Photo#1026956
Melanoplus plebejus - female

Melanoplus plebejus - Female
Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, USA
December 8, 2014
Size: 27,5 mm
I submit many photo details. I don't know if they are useful, but I thought they can be interesting to be seen, and after that they can be frass. No problem with that.
I think, it has curious wings.
Maybe Melanoplus plebejus. I found it in the same place like
The size of body, 27.5 mm, was measured form head to abdomen tip.
I found in this article
New and little known Mexican Melanopline (Orthoptera Acrididae) by Fontana P. and Buzzetti F.M., 2007
a different way to measure the body for grasshoppers, from head to the extremity of femur, see the first photo.
This it is the practice for grasshoppers size measurement? Or it is specific only for this article?

Images of this individual: tag all
Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female Melanoplus plebejus - female

Measuring
Here, I think most of the measurements are from the front of the face to the tip of the abdomen (or folded wings, or tip of hind femora, if they are longer); however, different people measure differently, and it is always good to state how you are measuring. Regrettably there is no standardization set up here (plus other types of insects may be measured differently). One nice thing about face to tip of hind femur is that it is perhaps the most constant measurement in short-winged species, because the length of the abdomen may vary tremendously depending on how well-fed the insect is or how many eggs are inside. However, in long-winged species, the wings don't vary in length with feeding or egg load any more than the legs do (unless the tips are worn off), and they often stick out way past the end of the hing femora or the abdomen - so - if you measure to the end of the legs in those, the insect will actually be longer. Some people like to include the antennae, but since they are held at all sorts of different angles, and since they tend to break easily, they should probably not be included in the measurement (but they can be measured as an added measurement. Often when antenna are measured though, it is in comparison to and in proportion to the head plus pronotum, or to the length of the hind femur, or something along those lines. In some hoppers (notably Crickets) some people will measure the antennae, and cerci or ovipositor and they can get a measurement approaching 3 inches for a 1 inch insect.

It can be confusing, because it's not constant. I have to admit I often don't say what measurement I'm taking (and I should), but it is generally from the front of the face to the tip of wings, hind femur, or abdomen (whichever sticks back the furthest). In the case of this one, I would have measured face to femur tip. There is an element of potential variability in this, because the abdomen in the same individual may be a different length from one day to the next (particularly in females). However, I figure the measurement at the current time of the photograph is the one that matters.

As for lots of photos, for species with few photos posted, this is great, because all of the sudden it is easy for someone to see a species from all sides. However, for a species that has lots and lots of photos posted already, it is best to stick with just what is needed to identify the insect and/or photos of details or forms that nobody (or hardly anyone) else has posted yet. Some repetition is good (it helps to show range of variation), but too much and we end up with hundreds of duplicated photos. In this case though, almost every shot is different, and there are very few photos of this species posted (or at least there were :0); there are only two shots here that are basically the same (and they are of opposite sides, though one of them wouldn't be missed), so for this one I think this is a good thing.

Moved from Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids.

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