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Photo#103059
Callicera erratica - male

Callicera erratica - Male
Fews Ford, Eno River State Park, Orange County, North Carolina, USA
April 6, 2007
Size: 13 mm
This buzzed down onto the ground on a cool spring day. I was sure it was a bee, then looked more closely. I picked it up and placed it on a picnic table for some photos and measured it. Thanks to Eric Eaton for correcting my (mis)identification, and to Martin Hauser for a further, and interesting correction--see comments.
(The yellowish dots are pollen grains from deciduous and coniferous trees--ubiquitous at this time of year.)
Here is the exact location, I think: 36.073828,-79.00678

This site seems to be good for rare flies--this was found very near where Roger Rittmaster and I found a Ceraturgus robber fly:


Update 4/27/14: This, and our other record to date, look to be males, with their holoptic eyes. An apparent female, with dichoptic eyes, is here, listed under the (synonymous) C. johnsoni.

Images of this individual: tag all
Callicera erratica - male Callicera erratica - male Callicera erratica - male

Moved
Moved from Microdon.

Callicera
Must be a good year for this genus, after this is the second pic in a few days of this very rare genus of Syrphids! And the other pic was the first time this genus has been fotographed on bugguide!
Great find - one of the rarest Syrphid genera in North America!

Moved--thanks Eric
Moved from Soldier flies.
(Refers to Eric's comment below)
Now, there, I thought it was a Microdon at first, especially due to the behavior--down on the ground, maybe looking for ants, but the antennae made me think it was a Stratiomyid. Maybe the little whiskers present on Microdon wore off.

Many thanks!

Syrphidae?
I'm thinking what you have there is a very worn and tattered (missing almost half of each wing) specimen of Microdon in the family Syrphidae. I don't see any spines on the thorax, which most soldier flies of that ilk have.

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