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Photo#1033581
Cotton Ball Bug - Crypticerya townsendi - female

Cotton Ball Bug - Crypticerya townsendi - Female
Toquerville, Washington County, Utah, USA
October 17, 2014
Size: about 8-10 mm
I found several of these on the lower stems of a rabbit brush like bush. They were motionless. I have never seen anything like it before and have no idea where to start. Pretty cool bug.

parasitoid shown at

Images of this individual: tag all
Cotton Ball Bug - Crypticerya townsendi - female Cotton Ball Bug - Crypticerya townsendi Cotton Ball Bug - Crypticerya townsendi

Moved tentatively
thanks for revisiting it, Ian

Moved from Ensign Scales.

Moved tentatively based on the following comment by Ian Stocks:
"The legs and antennae are suggestive of an Archaeococcidae, possibly Ortheziidae or less likely Monophlebidae. Several genera of ortheziids occur in northern states. See here."

Moved from Scales and Mealybugs.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Monophlebidae
Appears to be Crypticerya townsendi, but the female is rather old and did not mount properly. Also, there was a pharate female parasitoid inside, which probably caused some damage. Attached are images.If the ID can be conformed either by molecular data or earlier females that make better mounts, this appears to be a state record for Utah. Also, no parasitoids are documented in the literature.

 
Thank yoiu
Ian, I appreciate your help with this cool bug. Would you like me to get more specimens next time I venture towards Zion National Park?

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