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Photo#1040151
Oak Leaf Mine ID Request - Coptodisca

Oak Leaf Mine ID Request - Coptodisca
Herring Run Watershed, Baltimore City County, Maryland, USA
October 25, 2014
Observed on a Quercus sp.

Topside.

Images of this individual: tag all
Oak Leaf Mine ID Request - Coptodisca Oak Leaf Mine ID Request - Coptodisca Oak Leaf Mine ID Request - Coptodisca Oak Leaf Mine ID Request - Coptodisca

Moved
Moved from Unidentified Leaf Mines.
Very interesting. This is almost certainly an undescribed species. The only reference I have found to an eastern Coptodisca on oak is an offhand mention in Forbes' (1923) Lepidoptera of NY & Neighboring States that a "rather distinct form occurs on white oak." Any chance you can figure out what kind of oak this was? I'd also be curious to know the approximate size of this mine. The oak Coptodisca mines I've seen in California are tiny. In CA, there is a single described species on live oaks, and there are supposed to be 4-5 undescribed species on other oaks.

 
P.S.
I hope I didn't incorrectly ID the plant.

 
Toothed leaf margin is suspicious
Any chance this was actually a huge hickory leaflet?

 
Chinquapin Oaks
have this but again I am not able to say for sure. (Especially since this leaf is not densely hairy underneath.)

See:

http://www.carolinanature.com/trees/qumu.html

"In the White Oak group, Chinkapin Oak can quickly be told apart from Chestnut Oak and Swamp Chestnut Oak by the pointed teeth on the leaves."

 
Yes--
so I sent an email to my local plant guy to get his feedback. I will let you know if I was correct, or mistaken (for which I pre-emptively apologize profusely.)

 
Quite large--
this one was (relatively-speaking.) I will add less-cropped photos.

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