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Photo#1041952
tan damselfly - Lestes alacer - female

tan damselfly - Lestes alacer - Female
Salero Ranch, 8 mi E of Tubac, 4000 ft elevation, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
February 19, 2015

Images of this individual: tag all
tan damselfly - Lestes alacer - female tan damselfly - Lestes alacer - female

Moved
Moved from Spreadwings.

Moved

Lestes damselfly
this is a spreadwing damselfly, not a dragonfly. It's easy to confuse the 2 because the wings are held out to the side rather than folded back like they are other families of damselflies. This one might be an immature female Lestes alacer but wait for someone more knowledgable about western damselflies for the ID.

(is this really the same individual as shown in your linked photo?)

 
Damselfly - thanks. I didn't
Damselfly - thanks. I didn't know about the spread-wing ones. Yes, same individual in both photos. It didn't move far each time it sallied out. In fact, maybe it did not even fly but just moved around the branch to keep an eye on me.

 
not as common as pond damsels
I don't think the spread wings are as common as pond damsels, at least that's the situation in the places I know. However, the shape of the head/placement of the eyes and the slope of the part of the thorax where the wings attach give them away as damselflies

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