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Photo#1044407
Tmarus female - Tmarus angulatus - female

Tmarus female - Tmarus angulatus - Female
Stulsaft Park, Redwood City, San Mateo County, California, USA
March 4, 2015
Size: 5.5 mm
I beat this adult female spider from an oak tree. After live photographs, I collected the spider and preserved it as a specimen. It looks like it should be Tmarus angulatus, although I'm having trouble reconciling the appearance of the epigynum with the illustrations of that species in the literature. I probably need to research more and perhaps do an epigynum dissection...

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Tmarus female - Tmarus angulatus - female Tmarus female - Tmarus angulatus - female Tmarus female - Tmarus angulatus - female

Moved
Moved from Crab Spiders. Thanks John - I'm sure you're right. For some reason, I was having a hard time seeing the resemblance to the Schick illustrations yesterday, but I'll look at it again...

 
Added -
a photo of the dissected epigynum. I'm happier now about the match to T. angulatus, which was really the best option on geographic grounds all along anyway...

I think it has to be T angulatus
I believe the only other alternative is T. salai and it has a different looking epigynum. Yours is a pretty good match for the diagram in Schick, 1965.

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