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TaxonomyBrowse
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Species Trochosa sepulchralis

kitchen spider - Trochosa sepulchralis Trochosa sepulchralis Wolf Spider - Trochosa sepulchralis - male Wolf Spider - Trochosa sepulchralis - male Wolf - Trochosa sepulchralis Lycosidae --? - Trochosa sepulchralis Wolf Spider - Trochosa sepulchralis - female Trochosa sepulchralis - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Chelicerata (Chelicerates)
Class Arachnida (Arachnids)
Order Araneae (Spiders)
Infraorder Araneomorphae (True Spiders)
No Taxon (Entelegynae)
Family Lycosidae (Wolf Spiders)
Genus Trochosa
Species sepulchralis (Trochosa sepulchralis)
Explanation of Names
"The specific name was derived from the word sepulcher, a burial vault, and is likely a reflection upon the location from which it was first described: Philadelphia’s Woodlands Cemetery, where many of Montgomery’s specimens of this species were collected."(1)
Size
Female: 8-13mm
Male: 6.2-9.3mm(1)
Range
Throughout the central southern region of the United States. It is found from Florida in the east to Texas in the west, and north to New York.(1)
Habitat
The edge of woods where it is often collected by hand or through the use of pitfall traps.(1)
Works Cited
1.Trochosa sepulchralis , a senior synonym of Trochosa acompa , and the restoration of Trochosa abdita (Araneae, Lycosidae)
Jamin M. Dreyer and Allen R. Brady. 2008. The Journal of Arachnology.