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Photo#1052149
Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus

Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus
Commons Ford Ranch Metropolitan Park, 4 mi NE Bee Cave, Travis County, Texas, USA
March 31, 2015
Det. J. Neff, 2015

coll'ed via sweeps of low creek-side mixed vegetation

spmn in the UTIC, Austin, TX (1)

Images of this individual: tag all
Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus - female Halictus tripartitus Cockerell - Halictus tripartitus - female

Female
On the antennae, F1 & F2 appear to blend together in the fourth image, but you can still see the separation of them in the third image. (after the long pedical) A total of 10 = ♀
Often, the flagellum:base-length ratio or flagellum-length:head-width ratio is very reliable, when you can't count the individual segments. Also, the males don't have as much hair on the hind legs.
The abdomen and head differences are harder to see, but many of the male Sweat Bees have fancy leg spots. (not this one)
I'm sure that you probably know most of this already, but I will link one image, for other people to compare. Thanks for all of the great shots!

Moved
Moved from Subgenus Dialictus.

Moved
Moved from Sweat Bees.

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