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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#105310
P. minorata and spider - Priocnemis minorata - female

P. minorata and spider - Priocnemis minorata - Female
buffalo national river, newton County, Arkansas, USA
April 23, 2007
Size: wasp ~12mm spider bl~15mm
P. minorata that i could not bring myself to catch, as i have already taken three. also, i got the chance to watch the whole chase and catch of this spider that looked twice the size of the wasp. i was wondering what the spider was, it looks like a lycosid of some kind... i could not get a good picture of it though, as most of the time it was running for its life, and when it lost that race because of a number of stings, it made one last leap into this hand roll looking leaf where light could not reach it, then the wasp flipped it over and pulled it out on its back. i sharpened the picture to better show the spider... perhaps.

Images of this individual: tag all
P. minorata and spider - Priocnemis minorata - female P. minorata and spider - Priocnemis minorata - female

My two cents....
I hate to disagree with everybody, especially Nick, but this wasp reminds me more of Phanagenia bombycina, though it hasn't chewed the legs off of its prey....

 
Serrate HT visible in this shot
Immediately eliminating female Phanagenia.

nursery web spider
Looks like genus Pisaurina to me.

 
Pisaurina
that does look right, thank you Ben.

 
Not specialists
Great tackle by this small wasp. This genus is not known for specialization. Up to fifteen different spider families used in one study. Jeesh. I caught a Pompilid in my robber trap this week that was not a Priocnemis. Have not tackled it yet.

 
wasp
i have seen these P. minorata take many different spiders... just good to know what some of them are. also, it was quite the chase, very fun to watch. i have caught two Dipogon in the last couple of weeks, perhaps that is your unknown. i have not keyed mine out because i lack a key... i am working on that.

i have taken a Laphria flavicollis, you can add a mark for newton county... sadly i missed two other Laphria that were much too skittish for me, and i do not know what they were.

 
Key
Reply to me directly at the e-mail listed in my user profile and I'll see what I can do about a key, if you're interested. Marius Wasbauer has indicated to me that Townes (1957) is still (unfortunately) the most complete key for both Dipogon and Ageniella.

 
Key
You can use the online Pomp key to genera at the big Pomp project site. It is linked at my site. It will only confirm it is Dipogon. We have at least four. Mine did not have wing markings I don't believe.

I will note the Laphria. I saw L macquarti out yesterday.

 
key
i have visited the pompilid project many times, it is too bad it is only to genus.

i could not get a good look at my misses, but one looked a little like L. divisor, i thought it was another flavicollis until i got somewhat close and saw some yellow one of the last abdominal tergites. the other was more like this.

 
Maybe male Dipogon
Males usually emerge first and often lack wing markings (especially small individuals). I have records of D. papago anomalus, D. sayi sayi, and D. pulchripennis from mid-May in Ohio and Michigan so Dipogon is a good possibility at this time in Arkansas.

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