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Photo#105402
Flabellate antennae - Ripiphorus diadasiae - male

Flabellate antennae - Ripiphorus diadasiae - Male
Palo Comado Canyon, north of Agoura Hills, Los Angeles County, California, USA
April 25, 2007
Size: 11 mm
Unlike anything I've ever seen before. The photos aren't the best, but the best I could do with this VERY active insect. Caught with an aerial net near some swarming ground bees.

Images of this individual: tag all
Flabellate antennae - Ripiphorus diadasiae - male Flabellate antennae - Ripiphorus diadasiae - male Flabellate antennae - Ripiphorus diadasiae - male

Same photo...
...as is seen in Wikipedia.
Interesting...

 
yup...
I uploaded it there as well once I had an ID. :)

 
Cool!
If only I could figure out how to edit wikipedia, I'm sure I could do the same (code & software are not my strong points at all.)

Rhipiphoridae: Rhipiphorus...
Rhipiphoridae: Rhipiphorus... nice find... parasitic on hymenopterans

 
Thanks!
Thanks for the ID! I found a 1951 paper on the Rhipophoridae of California, in which this species keys out to Rhipophorus diadasiae. The paper also notes that this species parasitizes the bee Diadasia bituberculata. I've uploaded three images of the bee colony near which I caught this beetle here, which might help confirm the ID.

 
Look at this one?
Can you use your reference on this one, also from California, which looks similar:

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