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Photo#105542
Varroa mites on wasp - Ripiphorus diadasiae - male

Varroa mites on wasp - Ripiphorus diadasiae - Male
Burbank, Los Angeles County, California, USA
April 24, 2007
varroa mites and an ant on a dying wasp? unknown species to me.

Images of this individual: tag all
Varroa mites on wasp? - Ripiphorus diadasiae - male Varroa mites on wasp - Ripiphorus diadasiae - male

Adult rhipiphorids are very short-lived
I've read adult males often live for just a single day. So if you find one in the late afternoon it may indeed be dying...without mites or other factors necessarily contributing to the process.

I found a female once in the late afternoon (attached via her ovipositor to a flower head) that was very lethargic...almost life-less.

Are you sure they are varroa?
Although somewhat similar, they don't look like the varroa images I've seen. I notice another diferently-shaped mite (or something), a bit out of focus, is perched below the two flat mites.

Okay, now that I have seen the prior post and realize what this is, let me indicate that I see what might be *a* mite on the back below the elytra.

 
a red ant
that was an ant below on the lower part of the wings

 
I see it !
Now that I know what I'm looking at it's easy to see :-) Boy, what a visual tease this set of images has been!

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