Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information about the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#105724
Beetle larva

Beetle larva
Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA
April 26, 2007
Size: 11 mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Beetle larva Beetle larva Beetle larva Beetle larva

Moved
Moved from Larvae.

Moved
Moved from Ground Beetles.

Moved
Moved from Rove Beetles.

Carabidae, not Staphylinidae, larvae
This is a carabid (ground beetle), not a staph (rove beetle). Some members of those two groups can be hard to distinguish, but Carabidae usually have flattened, even slightly upturned, heads like this one and their urogomphi (the pair of projections on the 9th abdominal segment) are almost always solidly joined to the tergite of that segment. The staphylinids (subfamilies Paederinae and Staphylininae) that look most like carabids always have the urogomphi with an articulation, or joint, at the base. (Some staph larvae have unarticulated urogomphi, but they don't otherwise look like carabids.) Also, Carabidae (and the other Adephaga) have one more apparent segment in their legs than do Staphylinidae (and other Polyphaga) - Adephaga have a separate tarsus and claw, while Polyphaga have a fused "tarsungulus".

 
Thanks
a lot for the correction and such a detailed explanation!

Moved
Moved from Beetles.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.