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Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#10582
Golden Tortoise Beetle Larva - Charidotella sexpunctata

Golden Tortoise Beetle Larva - Charidotella sexpunctata
Fort Bragg, Cumberland County, North Carolina, USA
August 27, 2004

Moved

Tortoise Beetle Larva
I'm pretty sure this is a tortoise beetle larva. They are interesting as well as distinctive. The piece on top is probably a mix of discarded skin and excrement. They use a special anal fork to hold it over themselves and then block and deter predators (usually ants).

This didn't happen to be on the same plant as the tortoise beetle adults you posted, would it?

See these Guide Photos for some examples.

 
Neat, plausible NC species
It does seem likely this is Charidotella bicolor, based on its abundance at NCSU collection for North Carolina. Brimley, p. 231 (1) lists Metriona bivittata and Metriona bicolor from eastern North Carolina, where this photo was taken. I don't know what M. bitittata is now, the taxonomy is confusing.

These orthopedic shoes are pretty comfortable!

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

 
Agroiconota bivittata
Patrick,

Brimley lists the following Tortoise Beetle spp. on pg. 231:

- Metriona bivittata Say
- Metriona bicolor Fab.

Based on Riley et al, 2003, here's an abbreviated synonomy:

Agroiconota bivittata (Say)
- Cassida bivittata Say, 1826
- Metriona bivittata Say

Charidotella sexpuntata bicolor (Fabricius)
- Cassida bicolor Fabricius, 1798
- Metriona bicolor Fab.

Agroiconota bivittatais is common in the NC State Insect Collection.

Here are photos of Agroiconota bivittatais from Cedar Creek.

BTW, here's a state-based map for Charidotella sexpuntata bicolor. (Map is below image of C. s. sexpuntata.)

MQ, Austin

Texas Beetle Info
TexasEnto.net/beetles.htm

 
you're right
I looked it up and you're right. Thanks!

 
not morning glory
I don't remember what the plant was... it was not morning glory. My guess is it was some sort of tree.

Slug Caterpillar, perhaps?
See Guide page, but I don't see anything similar. Looks to me that it has decorated itself with feces, or something, for disguise.

(Ha, well, as so often is the case, I am wearing orthopedic shoes--I stand corrected.)

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

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