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Photo#105932
White bug - Pseudosinella spinosa

White bug - Pseudosinella spinosa
Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee, USA
April 27, 2007
Size: quite small
Found in Raccoon Mountain Caverns.

Images of this individual: tag all
White bug - Pseudosinella spinosa White bug - Pseudosinella spinosa

Moved

Pseudosinella spinosa
New for Bugguide!
This distinct Lepidocyrtus-like (humpbacked) Pseudosinella species is a true cave species. It is the largest Nearctic Pseudosinella. Indeed small is relative as Jim pointed out.
Pls do not frass the image.

With your permission I would like to use your picture(s) as illustrations at collembola.org. Credits and copyrights will be provided for each picture used. Thanks in advance.

@Jim: thanks for putting this under my attention :-)

 
Feel free to use the image
Feel free to use the image on the website.

 
Thanks
for your kind permission.

It appears to be a springtail,
well endowed in the antenna department but no doubt eyeless. Nice find and probably a new species for bugguide.

I'll put it where Frans Janssen will find it so it can be IDed.

You know, "quite small" can mean so many things to different people that it's almost pointless to use the expression. Maybe you could say something like "smaller than" a canary, a lima bean, a grain of rice, a grain of table salt, or whatever stikes your fancy.

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