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Information about the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

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Subspecies Tegrodera erosa erosa

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Butterflies of British Columbia
By Crispin S. Guppy, Jon H. Shepard
UBC Press, 2001
A magnificent volume!
"The authors describe all 187 species and 264 subspecies of butterflies in the province and surrounding areas, highlighted with colour photographs. They also discuss the biology, life history, range, habitat and conservation status for each. Ideal for beginners and serious butterfly watchers." More details here:
http://www.ubcpress.ubc.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=1856

Introducing the Dragonflies of British Columbia and the Yukon
By Robert A. Cannings
Royal British Columbia Museum, 2002
An absolutely indispensable guide to the Dragonflies of British Columbia (and the Yukon I suppose). Excellent text, identification keys and photographs. More details here:
http://www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/serv_prod/friends/publicat/zoology.html

Bugs of British Columbia
By John Acorn, Illustrated by Ian Sheldon
Lone Pine Publishing, 2001
A basic but representative guide to "the 125 Coolest Bugs of British Columbia." I have found this book very useful as a starting point when trying to identify local insects. Ian Sheldon's illustrations are attractive and accurate. John Acorn's text is a little too cute at times. He tries too hard to make entomology interesting and fun at the expense of more relevant information about some of his insect subjects (he doesn't have much room for his descriptive text -- half a page for each insect). But he generally leaves the reader with enough stimulation to search further in more specialized sources.

Bugs of Northern California
By John Acorn, Ian Sheldon
Lone Pine Publishing, 2002
A popular guide with notable species. Overlaps, partly, Bugs of Washington and Oregon. (1)

Bugs of Washington and Oregon
By John Acorn, Ian Sheldon
Lone Pine Publishing, 2001
A popular guide with some notable species. Overlaps, partly, Bugs of Northern California. (1)

Cerambycidae of North Dakota
By Guy A. Hanley
Minot State University, 2005
This new guide provides identification to 87 species of cerambycid, or longhorn beetles, that have been found in North Dakota. All species are treated one per page, with full color images, species descriptions, known habitats and ranges, and county distribution maps. Spiral bound. Contact the author at guy.hanley@minotstateu.edu or (701) 858-3076.

Dictionary of Word Roots and Combining Forms
By Donald J. Borror
Mayfield Publishing Company, 1960
I don't have this one yet, but it looks like it would be a nice reference to ferret out the meanings of those scientific names.

The Century Dictionary: an encyclopedic lexicon of the English language
New York, The Century Company, 1906
For the true lover of entomological etymology. The Century Dictionary is a treasure-trove of 19th century science and technology, including lots of zoology and botany. The origin of the names of obscure insect genera can sometimes be found in this work. (I had been unable to find the origin of Bomolocha anywhere else.) A mammoth, leather-bound, 10-volume work, long out of print, but available in university and large public libraries. A great source of public-domain zoological art as well, it is profusely illustrated with very detailed engravings. This was the American answer to the British Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Supposedly the editors of the OED left the technical material to the American work because it was so superior to their efforts.

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