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Photo#1068211
Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female

Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - Female
Tonopah Desert, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA
March 21, 2015
Size: 20mm Body - 50mm Legs
Full Size Image: Click Here

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Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home - Hogna carolinensis - female Desert Wolf Spider & Her Home (Burrow) - Hogna carolinensis

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Hey Bob,
...good job on the photos. We are currently holding all of these as Hogna carolinensis based on the ventral leg patterning. However, there is always the possibility of it being another subspecies, a separate morphological variation based on genetics or a completely "new" species all together. One way you could potentially help with such problem is by taking an image of the spider's epigynum (sex organs). If you could do this, we could correlate the images to what what have on the current H. carolinensis. If you can't do this, you can send the specimen to someone who may be able to do so. I'm currently a biology student who is interested in figuring the idea behind such ventral variations within these SW Lycosids, I will be happy to help if you'd like. Or, you could perhaps find a local institution to answer such question. Keep us updated on what you find!

 
Maybe ASU, in Phoenix/Tempe?
Chao, the third venter shot is very close to the magnification limit of my camera. I might be able to take one to ASU, if I can find a buggery-smart contact over there, but I still need a better camera or a microscope and some other things that I can't afford, haha! I'm not very interested in the dissection process, unless she has already passed on. Thanks

 
Epigynum shots...
...generally requires a good dissecting scope. I took these images with a decent camera and a moderately okay dissecting scope:





I haven't actually done the dissection process yet either! All of my images are of the ventrals (we also want dorsals at some point in time but that requires cutting open the spider). However, even with ventrals, we often have to work with dead specimens. If you want to raise your spider and wait for it to die, that is fine (I did that for all my specimens). ASU or UofA should have good enough equipment...you may want to ask or contact someone if interested. Good luck!

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