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Photo#10740
Nursery Web Spider - Pisaurina mira - male

Nursery Web Spider - Pisaurina mira - Male
Clayton, Johnston County, North Carolina, USA
February 1, 2005
Size: 2.5 - 3.0 inch leg span
Dolomedes vittatus (male)?

Images of this individual: tag all
Nursery Web Spider - Pisaurina mira - male Nursery Web Spider - Pisaurina mira - male Nursery Web Spider - Pisaurina mira - male Nursery Web Spider - Pisaurina mira - male

moved
I moved this to the nursery web spiders, please correct me it that's too presumptuous.

 
I think..
The misleading title should be changed.

Not sure either
You've clearly done some homework, but I don't think this is D. vittatus. I was thinking it might be Pisuarina as well, but I just can't convince myself either way. I do agree it looks like a male.

Pisaurina?
This does not look like a dolomedes to me

 
Re: Pisaurina?
I think you might be right on that Tom. I stumbled across the pictures of Pisaurina mira after posting these. It's very similiar to one paticular photo although there really isn't a pronounced wide dark stripe along the back.

 
dimorphism
P. mira is dimorphic. This could be the non-descript version. One of your photos shows the eyes; but I can't be sure of the genus by looking at them. The Dolomedes has highly variegated pattern on the legs.

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