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Photo#1087947
velvet mite - Johnstoniana

velvet mite - Johnstoniana
Kickapoo State Park, Vermilion County, Illinois, USA
October 12, 2014

Images of this individual: tag all
velvet mite - Johnstoniana velvet mite - Johnstoniana velvet mite - Johnstoniana

Moved
Moved from Johnstonianidae.

Moved

Neat!
Unfortunately, this mite is unidentifiable without a shot of the eyes. However, I suspect it is a johnstonianid, which is a really interesting group of mites that are thought to be a transitional step between velvet mites and water mites. Are you able to collect some? I would love to get specimens form your area.

 
I'll do my best
There remains the difficult matter of finding another one... at this state park, it seems like I never see the same type of mite twice! Can you link me to an article that describes exactly how to c9llect these if I see one again?

 
Collecting
There are no resources detailing information for collecting these things. At this point you just have to find one of the few folks working on the group and ask one of us. I am currently working on this problem and will hopefully have some online videos available in the next year or so.

For velvet mites and their relatives, the most effective method of collection is pitfall trapping. Simply bury a plastic drinking cup in the ground so that a mite will fall into it, and check the trap 24-36 hours later. For Johnstonianidae, this should be done in areas near water. As an alternative, examining the undersides of rocks and logs should yield some specimens as well.

Feel free to email me if you have more questions. Happy hunting! :)

 
How would I keep them to send
How would I keep them to send to you, rather?

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