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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#109247
7mm yellow and black beetle - Derospidea brevicollis

7mm yellow and black beetle - Derospidea brevicollis
Gainesville, Alachua County, Florida, USA
May 11, 2007
Size: 7 mm
Came into my house last night, so it spent the night in the refrigerator and was released today. I'm thinking maybe leaf beetle, but I don't really know.

Moved

This is Derospidea brevicolli
This is Derospidea brevicollis and feeds on prickly ash (Xanthoxylum). It superficially resembles Trirhabda but the pronotum is shorter than in that genus.

 
thanks John
sometimes I get it wrong. Glad your looking through everything now to look for mistakes.

 
This doesn't look like the two in the guide
but Rob had some reservation on those. Should we move this in and move those out?

 
The two pictures under Derosp
The two pictures under Derospidea are not that beetle but a Pyrrhalta. I just have not gotten that far yet in the illustrations to correct it. I am 100% sure this photo is D. brevicollis. I grew up in Florida and know it well. The host plant is also a dead give-away.

Correct! Galerucinae subfamily.
:-)

 
Thanks, Boris
I see a couple of similar ones listed as Trirabdha - what do you think?

 
looks good -
but I´m not familiar enough with your fauna to give a vote beyond that.

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