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Photo#1093913
Family Gryllidae - True Crickets ID please - Phyllopalpus pulchellus - male

Family Gryllidae - True Crickets ID please - Phyllopalpus pulchellus - Male
Skidaway Island, Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia, USA
July 1, 2015
This cricket was on the leaf of Tropical Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica), app a foot above ground. I believe it is possibly a last-instar juvenile, Gryllidae, Red-headed Bush Cricket (Phyllopalpus pulchellus). Temperature was 76 and overcast.ID please?

Images of this individual: tag all
Family Gryllidae - True Crickets ID please - Phyllopalpus pulchellus - male Family Gryllidae - True Crickets ID please - Phyllopalpus pulchellus - male Family Gryllidae - True Crickets ID please - Phyllopalpus pulchellus - male Family Gryllidae - True Crickets ID please - Phyllopalpus pulchellus - male

Moved
Moved from True Crickets.

 
Ken- thank you for having ide
Ken- thank you for having identified our submission as a Red-headed Bush Cricket (Phyllopalpus pulchellus). That was an amazingly short turn around response.

We located the cricket this morning while doing an examination for Monarch eggs and larvae on our seven Asclepias species. It was a 2nd locate of the insect by the same citizen scientist volunteer involved in our Project Monarch Health project!

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