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Photo#1095978
Pallid-winged grasshopper HIND WING - Trimerotropis pallidipennis - male

Pallid-winged grasshopper HIND WING - Trimerotropis pallidipennis - Male
El Paso, El Paso County, Texas, USA
July 4, 2015

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Pallid-winged grasshopper HIND WING - Trimerotropis pallidipennis - male Pallid-winged grasshopper Pallid-winged grasshopper Pallid-winged grasshopper Pallid-winged grasshopper Pallid-winged grasshopper Pallid-winged grasshopper

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I'm pretty sure this is good ol' Trimerotropis pallidipennis
It doesn't quite look like T. saxatilis, and I don't think that T. saxatilis occurs anywhere in the Chihuahuan Desert. In Texas it seems to not occur west nor south of the Edwards Plateau and other limestone Hill Country in the central part of the state. It wouldn't surprise me to see it somewhat further west, but I doubt it is found in the El Paso area.

However, it is worth watching the insects occuring on the rocks in the Franklins - I could be wrong. You should catch some and photograph the hind wings, they look different on the two species.

 
I caught one!
I was able to catch one of these grasshoppers and take a photo of the hind wing.

 
Kind'a fun - and challenging I expect
Anyway, that definitely looks like the wing of Trimerotropis pallidipennis.

This probably can't happen up on the rocks (unless you use your own portable lights), but an easy way to catch them (it's almost like cheating), is to find a truck stop or some other place with large mercury vapor or similarly bright lights, and check the lights out on a calm warm evening. These things come to lights like moths. However, T. saxatilis rarely shows up at lights, because there are rarely any bright lights in it's habitat, and it doesn't seem to ever fly very far from home. T. pallidipennis, on the other hand, can and sometimes does fly many miles. Lots of other interesting things (Orthoptera included) may show up at the same lights.

 
Great info and tips!
I was able to catch this one after around 15 attempts. Every time I would get close, it would fly away a few yards. I persisted approaching it slowly until, I guess, it gave up and let its guard down.

 
Thanks!
Most times, when I am taking pictures of bugs I do not carry collection equipment with me, but I appreciate your help in identifying this bug and your kind advice. I will try to use my sweep net and collecting equipment more often. THANKS!

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