Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Interested in a 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico?

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#111070
Large Stonefly - Hesperoperla pacifica

Large Stonefly - Hesperoperla pacifica
Thompson River, Sanders County, Montana, USA
May 8, 2007
Size: around 3 cm?

Images of this individual: tag all
Large Stonefly - Hesperoperla pacifica Large Stonefly - Hesperoperla pacifica Large Stonefly - Hesperoperla pacifica Large Stonefly - Hesperoperla pacifica

Moved
Thanks to both of you. I used your ID and searched some more on the interenet. I found this image, which I think is good a good enough match to move it to a species page. See West Fly

Probably Hesperoperla
With the proviso that I'm less familiar with Western species, I believe this is probably Hesperoperla pacifica. These are common Western perlids that form a loose group that anglers call "Golden Stones." The emergence of these, along with such Western perlid species as Calineuria californica and Claassenia sabulosa, is only slightly less famous than the grand emergence of the Salmonflies (Pteronarcys spp., especially Pteronarcys californica).

I've looked around for another example for comparison, and this is the best I could find. This image is not the best (dark, and not nearly as crisp as your photos), but it should serve to show similarities. Still, I wish someone who was more in tune with the Western stonies could have a look your perlid.

Perlidae
would be my guess. At 3 cm it is too small for a pteronarcid.

 
Size
I don't think I would ID based on size alone. I went from memory, and it's not very reliable.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.