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Photo#1114210
Tiny bees - Perdita cladothricis

Tiny bees - Perdita cladothricis
El Paso, El Paso County, Texas, USA
August 2, 2015
These tiny wasps were flying with amazing speed in zig-zag patterns and competing for the flowers of a small desert weed.
Coordinates: 31.755001, -106.250932

Images of this individual: tag all
Tiny bees - Perdita cladothricis Tiny bees - Perdita cladothricis Tiny bees - Perdita cladothricis Tiny bees - Perdita cladothricis

Moved
Moved from Perdita.

 
Thank you John!
This reminds me that I should search for these bees again and try to produce clearer images.

 
The plant on which you saw these little bees
looks like, and is most certainly Tidestromia lanuginosa (Woolly Tidestromia, Amaranthaceae).

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Thank you Go!
I appreciate your time, attention, and kind assistance.

 
She is indeed a great contributor
-

bees
Perdita i think

 
Yes, reminds me of P. cladothricis
What is the host plant? That is very helpful when identifying Perdita!

 
It took me a long time to
get an ID on this plant, but finally an accomplished plant taxonomist (now retired) identified it as Tidestromia lanuginose. Zach was right on the genus. I hope this helps in narrowing Perdita species. Thanks!

 
Yes
Definitely P. cladothricis. Looks like the plant is Tidestromia.

 
Thanks John!
I will go to back to the site tomorrow, take a photo of the plant and seek help to identify it. Thank you again.

chalcid
The higher antenna placement and slight metallic shine suggests this group.

I'm sure others will be able to tell you more.

 
Thank you for your help.
I appreciate your kind assistance.

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