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Photo#1119400
Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (dorsal head) - Liris - female

Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (dorsal head) - Liris - Female
Tonopah Desert, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA
May 7, 2015
Size: 13mm
Full Size Image: Click Here

Sexing Information: (antennae segments)
(applicable to other taxa, above tribe & family levels)
1) - flagellomeres = 10 = female
2) - flagellomeres = 11 = male

Images of this individual: tag all
Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (ventral) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (ventral abdomen) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (mandibles) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (ventral legs) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (dorsal legs) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (wings #1) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (wings #2) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (dorsal head) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (face #1) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (face #2) - Liris - female Square-headed Wasp Body Scan (golden chevron) - Liris - female

Sexing info for the genus!
If you look at the image of a male's head, (linked below) you might notice that at the eye's apical edge has a sharp and almost 90deg. angle. (near the centerline-top-back of the head)
On the other hand, the females have nothing but smooth curves on that part of their eyes. This character is important enough to look for in other images, when sexing these wasps:
This info might apply to other wasps, higher up the taxonomy tree, as well. I will have to remember this.
Thanks goes out to Jason R. Eckberg, for providing us with the image!

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Eye Evolution
John, I had never seen vestigial ocelli, before looking at her face. It seems that the lower one may still have enough structure to function as a light detector. FYI - I rejected several images of the two scars, because not much else was in view or else the views just seemed to be too redundant. If I find any keying info that I can apply to her footage, I will look for the perfect shot and try to crop out and add that into this series, if necessary. Thanks again!

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