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Photo#1121313
P. apacheanus or P. cardinalis? - Phidippus

P. apacheanus or P. cardinalis? - Phidippus
El Paso, El Paso County, Texas, USA
August 13, 2015
Gorgeous salticid

Images of this individual: tag all
P. apacheanus or P. cardinalis? - Phidippus P. apacheanus or P. cardinalis? - Phidippus

Moved to genus for now
Moved from Jumping Spiders.

 
Thank you chad!
for your kind help

Phidippus
I suspect that this is P. apacheanus. The color of the epidermis of the carapace (not the scale color) on P. apacheanus is black, and P. cardinalis has a carapace with a red hue. They are both fall-maturing species, so that doesn't help. Generally, P. cardinalis is a grass field species, however they are sometimes found in scrub habitats on cactus as are P. apacheanus.

 
THANKS!
Thank you Don and Chad! I photographed this specimen at Rio Bosque Wetlands Park. The location has sandy soils and a long channel with slow flowing water. Plant species vary from desert-adapted plants, aquatic plants, and those belonging to wetland habitats. The most abundant tree is the screwbean mesquite. I see a great abundance and diversity of odonata, flies (especially bombyliidae, syrphidae, and asilidae), and grasshoppers. I have seen this Phidippus species at other locations in east El Paso. Thank you again for your kind help.

Moved for the experts
Moved from ID Request. Yes, it is one of those. It helps if you get face shots for distinguishing those two species.

 
Thanks!
I would have loved to take shots from every angle as I found this spider very attractive. However, my attraction was not reciprocated and I got lucky to take the few photos I did. Thank you again for your kind help.

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