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Photo#1122282
Blotch mine of Populus deltoides - Paraleucoptera albella

Blotch mine of Populus deltoides - Paraleucoptera albella
Mehan, Payne County, Oklahoma, USA
August 14, 2015
Size: 1mm
dead larva. Best resolution with available equipment, I'm afraid - feel free to frass this (or the whole entry, if further resolution isn't possible!).

I've been seeking other examples, and have found interesting mines from other species, but no duplicates of this one.

Images of this individual: tag all
Blotch mine of Populus deltoides - Paraleucoptera albella Blotch mine of Populus deltoides Blotch mine of Populus deltoides Blotch mine of Populus deltoides - Paraleucoptera albella Blotch mine of Populus deltoides - Paraleucoptera albella

Moved
Moved from Frass.

 
OK
Though I think the new images (https://bugguide.net/node/view/1567064/bgimage) from this year (and the same tree!) are superior to this failed mine and dead larva.



By the way, the larvae let their mines yesterday and are forming their cute Lyonetiid pupation shelters. I'll try to take a picture today.

 
See my comment on the first image--
I kept them mainly because of the view of the eggs; also this is the only shot of a larva out of a mine, though I agree that your new one of the larva inside a mine is much better.

Frassed

Moved

Interesting...
This doesn't resemble the lyonetiid larvae I've seen, but I only have photos of mature larvae that have exited their mines. I'll have to ponder this one.

 
I think I'll take a ladder to
I think I'll take a ladder to the tree, to look for others!
But the number of fungal necrotic blotches, as well as a variety of window feeders, makes such a search especially challenging... And the tree is beginning to drop leaves due to an extended dry spell.

Oh, and note that although this pose is somewhat lifelike, the larva is quite shriveled. Probably was a bit plumper when alive.

 
Take a look at...
this (scroll down a few pages for egg & larva descriptions). The eggs seem to match; the larvae do not have that black thoracic shield that yours has, but maybe that is a feature of the first instar that wasn't observed. Assuming you haven't discovered something entirely new, P. albella seems to be the only possible fit among the known Populus miners. Zeugophora mines are similar, but the eggs are inserted in pits chewed in the lower epidermis.

 
Sounds like a successful P. a
Sounds like a successful P. albella mine should be very easy to spot, based on the description in the paper. It would not be surprising that hosts stage a vigorous chemical attack against something so devastating.
The eggs sound right.

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