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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#11237
Green Stink Bug - Chinavia hilaris

Green Stink Bug - Chinavia hilaris
Fort Bragg, Cumberland County, North Carolina, USA
June 4, 2004
Southern Green Stink Bug - Nezara viridula?

Moved
Moved from Acrosternum.

Moved
Moved from Nezara / Acrosternum.
For Reasons compare comment on Nezara page.

Nezara / Acrosternum
Nezara / Acrosternum are very similar. According to Slater, How to Know the True Bugs, you have to key based on a character visible on the ventral surface. I've done this just once, see my photos of Green Stink Bug - Acrosternum hilare.

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

 
Nezara/Acrosternum
I finally gave your comments and photos some real attention. It seems most likely that my photo is actually Acrosternum as well. I will be turning and photographing some green stink bugs this summer! Do you happen to have a photo of the underside of the Nezara species?

 
Negative on Nezara
Nope, no Nezara photos at all--I'm just starting on those stinkers. Looking at the NCSU collection, I'd say they aren't too common in North Carolina, at least in my neck of the woods. Maybe they are more common in Sandhills and Coastal Plain, though--a lot of more southeastern flora and fauna seem to be.

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

 
Nezara
is an invasive species in Europe. See the Pentatomidae here, for some very cool shots.

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