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Photo#1125747
Cosmet Moth - Cosmopterix teligera

Cosmet Moth - Cosmopterix teligera
Mobile (Dog River), Mobile County, Alabama, USA
August 20, 2015
Size: 4-5mm
The antennae "bar code" suggests Cosmopterix gemmiferella. Until such time as I can get a descent photo, it at least adds August datapoint for genus in Alabama.

Antennae pattern points to teligera actually
Here is what Koster says:

teligera (apex-base): 8 white, 10 brown, 2 white, 2 brown, 2-3 white, 6 brown, then brown-white mixture for rest.

lespedezae (apex-base): 8 white, 10 brown, 2 white, 2 brown, 4 white, 7 brown, then brown-white mixture for rest.

So the third white section from the apex is larger in lespedezae than in teligera.

Of course, this is all tentative. I don't know how reliable this trait is, but it's the best I have to work with. Dissection would be the only foolproof way.

Moved from Cosmopterix lespedezae.

Keys out to C. lespedezae using Hodges' MONA fascicle.
Moved from Cosmopterix.

I agree that the antenna patt
I agree that the antenna pattern looks like C. gemmiferella but the rest of the moth doesn't.

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