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Photo#1125955
Male Agapostemon virescens - Agapostemon virescens - male

Male Agapostemon virescens - Agapostemon virescens - Male
Pocantico Hills, Westchester County, New York, USA
August 21, 2015
Size: est. 4/10 inches
Male agapostemon on Joe Pye weed (& greenhouse window). Picture #1 shows sternum & leg markings. Which species? Thanks!

Images of this individual: tag all
Male Agapostemon virescens - Agapostemon virescens - male Bi-colored Agapostemon male - Agapostemon virescens - male Agapostemon male  - Agapostemon virescens - male Agapostemon virescens male  - Agapostemon virescens - male

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
A. virescens
Thanks very much!

Agapostemon virescens
Jatai, I believe that this is a common species in your area and the leg shapes and paintings, the face and sturna, all have that same look. Great shots!
Please send me a email about the greenhouse sometime. OK? Thanks

 
Yes
Note black sterna

 
Agapostemon male
We also have A. texanus and A. sericeus here -- the males are so similar, just thought I should double-check.

 
Wait for the experts!
I think that the paint job is a little bit different on both of those species and also, the hind femora are too thin for A. splendens, but let's wait for Dr. Ascher to confirm.

 
Bi-colored Agapostemon
Thanks! That's useful information.

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