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Discussion of 2018 gathering

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

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Photo#11270
Assassin Bug - Rhiginia cruciata

Assassin Bug - Rhiginia cruciata
Cumberland County, North Carolina, USA
April 7, 2004

Images of this individual: tag all
Assassin Bug - Rhiginia cruciata Assassin Bug - Rhiginia cruciata

Neat, where found?
Neat. How did you find this? They are supposed to be nocturnal, but supposedly can be found under bark (over winter) or at lights. I've found just one, that was caught in a spider's web on the floor of a deciduous forest.

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

 
Diurnal.
I wonder if Troy is thinking of a different genus. All the specimens I have collected were highly active, and very much diurnal. They are quick to fly in fact.

 
Reference on nocturnal/diurnal
It was me, not Troy. Taber, Insects of the Texas Lost Pines says that species was highly nocturnal, they found it at lights but not during the day. Obviously, you may have more field experience with the bug than those authors.

I'll be looking for these this spring, for sure. Thanks for the information.

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

 
I wonder....
I think this genus is confused, now that I think about it. I collected a species this summer in Arizona, at night, but it is different from the one I collected in Ohio and Missouri by day. Yet, only one species is listed for the genus. I wonder if it was split!

 
Hmmm
Well, I know it wasn't at night. I find 99% of the bugs within a mile radius of my house...so I would say down the street at the nature trail. It was probably either morning or evening when I walk the dog.

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