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Photo#113278
Wasp - Calopompilus maculipennis - female

Wasp - Calopompilus maculipennis - Female
Sand Springs, Osage County, Oklahoma, USA
May 27, 2007
Size: 1"
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Comments : Please Help With ID. Eric, here is a wasp you requested.
Additional Questions :
Location Specifics :
Night or Day : Day
Came To Lights (Y or N or N/A) : N/A
Flight Capable (Y or N) : Y
Plant : N/A
Tree : N/A
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I Think It Is :
Common Name : Spider Wasp
Scientific Name : Calopompilus maculipennis
Reference : http://bugguide.net/node/view/35174
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CK # : 0311
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Images of this individual: tag all
Wasp - Calopompilus maculipennis - female Wasp - Calopompilus maculipennis - female Wasp - Calopompilus maculipennis - female

I guess I beat Eric to it...
I don't know if he'll be commenting on this long weekend but I can offer an ID. This looks like a female Calopompilus maculipennis (Pompilidae). The legs and antennae are rather short for a Pompilid and coupled with these features it makes the large, orange subapical spot on the anterior wings diagnostic.

 
C. maculipennis
why can i not find these... also, do you have any suggestions on identifying an Auplopus to species?

 
Auplopus
E-mail me about this. If you don't have Townes, I'll hook you up with those keys. Apparently no new nearctic Auplopus has been described since then.

 
Simple...
because they're rare! There is record from Imboden, Arkansas (Townes, 1957) and this species is found throughout the southern half of the U.S. east of the Rockies. Unfortunately the genus as a whole is very rare and would probably take some intense searching to find it. I've only ever seen one live specimen of C. fortis in Ohio, and that's supposed to be the most common species!

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