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Photo#1135777
Spider Wasp Wingman - Hemipepsis ustulata - male

Spider Wasp Wingman - Hemipepsis ustulata - Male
Tonopah Desert, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA
May 10, 2015
Size: 19mm
These are images of a Spider Wasp, that I believe is a male Hemipepsis ustulata. There must have been a technical issue and all I have is a few dorsal views of him, sorry.

Images of this individual: tag all
Spider Wasp Wingman - Hemipepsis ustulata - male Spider Wasp Wingman - Hemipepsis ustulata - male Spider Wasp Wingman - Hemipepsis ustulata - male

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Cell structures
After reviewing this family several times, the closest look-a-like seems to be Entypus aratus, but those wasps have a wider 1st discoidal cell and the submarginal cells are also slightly different shapes. Cell S2 is much longer on my wasp, with the vein between S1 & S2 looking bowed into S1. Also, right next to this vein, on the apical quarter of S1, you can see a crease, perpendicular to the wing edge, on the basal edge of the stigma. (third image) This crease appears to subdivide S1 and though it is not a spurious vein, it appears in some of the wing images of the wasps in this genus and may reflect the light in such a way as to appear as an extra vein. The bowed shape of the apex into the 1st discoidal (D1 & D3) is much more pronounced on these wasps and more easily visible in most images.

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