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Photo#1137450
small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana

small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana
walnut creek, California, USA
September 10, 2015
Size: 6-7mm
I'm guessing that this is a robber fly but could not find any species with this long body.

Images of this individual: tag all
small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana small true fly(?) with long tail and long back legs - Leptopteromyia americana

Great find Cuneyt!
This is quite an interesting specimen for a number of reasons. It is by far the northernmost record of the genus, and it supports the hypothesis that L. americana is a recent introduction to California state. This apparent range expansion is likely correlated with the movements of their Embiopteran hosts.

 
Thank you.
It's good to see that my photography hobby produced something useful for the scientific knowledge base.

Now that I know what this fly is and know that it's living with embiopteran hosts (which I didn't know anything about before), I checked my old pictures and found this one:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/cozdas/15109051628/in/album-72157644210564885/

At that time I thought it was a kind of a termite but now I think it's a webspinner. Can you please confirm?

I'll add more photos of this L. americana specimen and will dig my archive to see if I have more pictures of the webspinner (if it's what it is). Please let me know if I can be of any assistance to you scientists.

 
I'm certainly no expert on th
I'm certainly no expert on this order, but it absolutely looks like a webspinner.

 
Cute critter! Sure looks pos
Cute critter! Sure looks possible, but I'm not at all familiar with the order. If you'd like to get a closer ID on that particular one, you might submit it to ID Request as well, but it's entirely your call!

Here is a reference to a 2013
Here is a reference to a 2013 (2014?) ESA poster presented by Chris Cohen/ Torsten Dikow on the genus Leptopteromyia:

 
Hi Dr. Fisher - the link/refe
Hi Dr. Fisher - the link/reference unfortunately didn't appear with your comment. Thanks!

 
This is the link: http://www.
This is the link: http://www.mnh.si.edu/NHRE/posterPDFs/2013-Cohen-poster.pdf.
(The carrot marks < > prevented it from appearing before ...)

 
So the
TX GA and FL records will all be the single eastern new species then. And nice poster.

 
Thanks!
However, it's been quite a while since I've looked at this genus. Things might change by the time Torsten and I publish.

Moved
Moved from Leptogastrinae.

Leptopteromyia americana, mal
Leptopteromyia americana, male; an amazing find Cuneyt ! This is a new genus and species for BugGuide. A 2014 study by Chris Cohen & Torsten Dikow found this unusual fly in California (the Los Angeles area) for the first time, and now you find it far to the north in the Bay Area !
Leptopteromyia spp. all live in the silken nests of Embioptera, webspinners--most of them in South America.

 
paper online?
Is that paper published and/or online somewhere, or are you referring to the poster linked elsewhere in these comments? Would be great to check it out I just saw one of these just a few miles away from this one: http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/2103242

 
The revision has not been pub
The revision has not been published yet. Another great find btw; it would seem that this species is quickly becoming established in the region.

 
Hah! how could I know?
This fly looked very different to me too, never saw a similar fly in my 5+ years of macro experience in CA. This guy was drowning in our hot-tub when I took it out. With naked eye first I thought it was a wasp then saw the eyes and the halteres and realized that it was a fly. I took lots of pictures of it. While I was taking pictures it started to move so after the photo session I set if free.

I have more and higher resolution pictures if anyone is interested in. I'm new to bug guide. Will someone open a new section? Is there anything I should do?

 
Your first
images ever are of this fly? Look out. And thanks to Dr. Fisher for taking a look.

 
New genus and species pages a
New genus and species pages added - many thanks for such a wonderful contribution (both to BugGuide and to entomology) with this find! Feel free to submit additional photos if you like; given the rarity of the specimen I'm sure they're appreciated.

Truly
tiny if your 3 to 4 mm is correct. And the Beameromyia are the smallest in general among the three genera of Leptos in CA. Would need wing and facial shots to make a genus call.

 
Thanks all. I uploaded few
Thanks all.

I uploaded few more images of the same specimen. Truly, you are right, probably it was longer than 3-4 mm when the full tail is considered, so I updated the record to 6-7mm. The fly was alive and I set it free thus can't measure it.

 
Astoundingly
I cannot make that wing fit anything but Leptopteromyia. This genus is not known from CA. (As though CA needed any more Asilid genera.) It is known from Baja. I will have to see where in CA you are located. But if it is Leptopteromyia, this should stir up Dr. Fisher.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Leptogastrinae?
Leptogastrinae?

(as an example, not a guess to genus:


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