Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico, July 20-24

National Moth Week was July 23-31, 2022! See moth submissions.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Photos of insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12


Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
The New World tarantula-hawk wasp genus Pepsis Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae).
By C. R. Vardy
Zoologische Verhandelingen / Zoologische Mededelingen, 2005
Cite: 1138775 with citation markup [cite:1138775]
This is currently the most up-to-date treatment of the genus Pepsis...published in three parts between 2000 and 2005 (by two different publishers).

Part 1. Introduction and the P. rubra species-group. Zool. Verhandel., vol. 332 (2000), pp. 1-86. (Full Text)
Part 2. The P. grossa- to P. deaurata-groups. Zool. Verhandel., vol. 338 (2002), pp. 1-134. (Full Text)
Part 3. The P. inclyta- to P. auriguttata-groups. Zool. Meded., vol. 79-5 (2005), pp. 1-305. (Full Text)

This work covers all the (many!) New World taxa in Pepsis...most of which occur south of the US, and thus outside our area. Below is a list of the 14 currently recognized species recorded from our area, indicating the Part and page number in Vardy where its description/discussion appears:

      P. aquila: Part 2, p. 63
      P. basifusca: Part 3, p.141
      P. cassiope: Part 2, p. 92
      P. chrysothemis: Part 1, p. 74
      P. grossa: Part 2, p. 58
      P. marginata: Part 2, p. 67
      P. menechma: Part 3, p. 131
      P. mexicana: Part 1, p. 65
      P. mildei: Part 3, p. 229
      P. pallidolimbata: Part 1, p. 77
      P. ruficornis: Part 3, p. 232
      P. sommeri: Part 3, p. 96
      P. terminata: Part 2, p. 68
      P. thisbe: Part 1, p. 60

A number of previous species names appearing in earlier treatments [e.g. Hurd(1)(1952), Townes(2)(1957), and Krombein(3)(1979)] have been changed by Vardy. Below is a list of old names for species in our area, followed by their new names under Vardy's synonymies:

      "P. angustimarginata" = P. basifusca
      "P. arizonica" = P. cassiope
      "P. azteca"= P. sommeri
      "P. cerberus" = P. menechma
      "P. elegans" = P. menechma
      "P. formosa" = P. grossa
      "P. saphirus" = P. ruficornis
      "P. venusta" = P. terminata

no link?
links don't work thanks

 
Ever-blossoming dead links...a bane of internet operability!!
Wish there were a built-in rerouting script that would automatically set up "redirects" whenever IT (or other) folks decide to fiddle with their existing server's file folder & filename structures!! Every time a change is made unknowns scads of dependent "downstream" links can get severed!

Anyway, all's well in this case (for now)...using Duck-Duck-Go I found the following replacement links (who knows how long until they'll be changed? ;-):

*) A single "DANS/Narcis" search results page with links to portal pages for downloading the PDF's for each of the 3 parts of Vardy's venerable Pepsis revision...with, in particular, the:

  1) Portal page for Part 1...with direct PDF download link = https://repository.naturalis.nl/pub/219443/ZV332_003-086.pdf;

  2) Portal page for Part 2...with direct PDF download link = https://repository.naturalis.nl/pub/220200/ZV338_003-135.pdf;

  3) Portal page for Part 3...with direct PDF download link = https://repository.naturalis.nl/pub/210789/ZM79-05_001-305.pdf

PS: I suppose I shouldn't get too irritated about the dead links here...after all, it's quite a gift that so many of us can have such relatively easy access to thousands of formerly very hard to obtain scholarly works like Vardy's! Thank you Mr. Vardy, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, and the multitudes of others that make it all possible :-)

 
thank you
thank you for your help Aaron :)

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.