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Species Vaejovis cashi

Vaejovis cashi Vaejovis cashi Small scorpion with her babies - Vaejovis cashi - female Small scorpion with her babies - Vaejovis cashi - female Small scorpion with her babies - Vaejovis cashi - female Small scorpion with her babies - Vaejovis cashi - female Small scorpion with her babies - Vaejovis cashi - female Small scorpion with her babies - Vaejovis cashi - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Chelicerata (Chelicerates)
Class Arachnida (Arachnids)
Order Scorpiones (Scorpions)
Family Vaejovidae
Genus Vaejovis
Species cashi (Vaejovis cashi)
Explanation of Names
Named after Kevin Cash, who collected the type series.
Size
25-30 mm
Range
SE Arizona and SW New Mexico in the Chiricahua, Peloncillo, and Animas mountains.
Habitat
Most common in rocky areas in Madrean pine-oak communities from 5,000-9,500 ft. Under rocks and other surface objects and in trees under bark. Does not burrow.
Season
Surface activity in temperatures as low as 42° F.
Remarks
Perhaps the most abundant scorpion in the Chiricahua Mountains, found from as low as Cave Creek near Portal to the summit.
Venom is extremely weak with no ill effects to humans.
See Also
Vaejovis vorhiesi, with which it has been misidentified.